Are Fruit and Veggie Washes Really Better?

By Leah Kaminsky

It seems like every grocery store I go to these days is touting their “green” veggie and fruit washes. “Get rid of pesticides!” they proclaim. “Eat healthier!” Naturally, the allure of such products is tempting, but the last thing I want to do is remove pesticides by spraying my produce with more chemicals. So, what’s the truth? Are fruit and veggie washes really a good idea?

First, as this study of one fruit and vegetable wash shows, there’s really no way to get rid of all pesticides if they’ve been applied systemically. However, pesticides, bacteria and dirt that appear on the surface of produce is much more easily removed. While water will do the trick for water-soluble pesticides, you need something with a little more acidity for those that aren’t (and good luck figuring out on your own which one is on your apple). That makes sense if you look at the ingredients for one produce cleaner called Fit, which operates primarily through its many acids:

Ingredients in Fit: Purified water, oleic acid (from Vegetable Sources), Glycerol (from Vegetable Sources), Ethyl Alcohol (from Corn), Potassium Hydrate (from Basic Minerals), Baking Soda (from Basic Minerals), Citric Acid (from Cornstarch and Molasses), and Distilled Grapefruit Oil.

None of these ingredients are particularly harmful or unnatural. This renders that fear of replacing chemicals with chemicals largely unfounded, making the question less, “Is it safe?” than, “Is it necessary?”

According to another study completed by Jack Bishop of Cook’s Illustrated, the answer is a solid no. As Bishop suggests, all you really need is a bottle of vinegar slightly diluted with water to have the same effect.

In the end, it seems distilled water, vinegar, or one of these simple home remedies (here and here) will do the trick just fine. What you wash produce with is far less important than simply washing it. So wash away, and eat up!

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