Green Your Coffee Drinking Habit

By Leah Kaminsky

When you live without sun for nine months out of the year, it’s hard not to become a hardcore coffee addict. I learned this pretty quickly when I moved to Seattle and began to work the hardest I ever had in my life. But much to the chagrin of eco-conscious coffee drinkers like myself, coffee isn’t exactly the most sustainable product. In order to mitigate coffee’s environmental and social costs, here are a few key things to keep in mind.

1. Find the Right Beans

First, take a look at how the beans are grown. You’ll want them to be organic and shade-grown. Why? Because organic coffee keeps pesticides and artificial fertilizers out of the ecosystem, while coffee grown in the shade of trees provides places for migratory birds to rest and feed themselves throughout their long journeys, and also produces the type of biodiversity that protects coffee crops from the kinds of pests that require herbicides. Look specifically for “rustic” shade cover, which provides 70 – 100% coverage.

Next, make sure those beans are Fair Trade Certified to ensure they were sourced from a farm with fair and humane labor practices.

Do you know where your daily coffee beans are grown?
(Image via: http://www.flickr.com/photos/8896706@N05/with/6149598235/#photo_6149598235)

2. Go Local

If possible, buy from a local farmer or at least local roasters who work hard to develop relationships with farmers and co-ops.

3. Make Your Own and Clean it Up

Love paper filters as you might, they’re just not as sustainable as the reusable kind. If you must use them, compost them along with your grounds, the latter of which you can compost right into your garden. When cleaning your coffee maker, stay away from any chemicals, opting for vinegar or another natural alternative instead. To save energy, make sure to switch off your machine rather than warming your coffee all day.

4. Drinking in Style

It should go without saying, but drink from a washable porcelain mug rather than a paper cup. Most good coffee shops these days sell travel mugs that look like their paper counterparts, and they’re well worth the investment.

With a little foresight, your coffee drinking habit can be sustainable. You just have to put a little effort into sourcing and be willing to pay more not just for the beans but for the certifications as well. So green your coffee and drink up!

 

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