Monthly Archives: September 2012

Green Honeymoons

By Leah Kaminsky

For those of us who love the earth and romantic getaways, thoughts of our carbon footprint can turn those daydreams of exotic destinations into guilt. This is especially true with honeymoons, a time when eco-conscious couples want to live life to the fullest without feeling eco-guilt. Fortunately, there are plenty of ways to be green while honeymooning. We’ve compiled just a few below.

Couples that seek a green honeymoon have a world of options

Stay Close to Home

That far-off destination doesn’t actually have to be so far off. Couples that live in big cities can find a whole new world in a vibrant neighborhood on the other side of town, or head out into the countryside or regional hot spots. This will keep the travel footprint low and the bill low, too.

Honeyteering

For the idealistic couple a volunteer honeymoon is a great way to go. Get to know the locals by helping build rain barrels. Or, explore the world’s best organic farms when you volunteer with World Wide Opportunities on Organic Farms (WWOOF). You’ll eat great food, learn about a foreign culture, and help promote sustainability all at once.

Eco-Retreats and Eco-Hotels

As eco-retreats increase in popularity, so, too, do the variety available. Explore the Honduran rainforest or spend the night in a treehouse in the Norwegian woods. Or simply look for hotels that promote sustainable practices, like not washing sheets every day and recycling toiletries.

National Parks

For outdoorsy couples, national parks make a great option. Spend your honeymoon exploring all the natural wonders these parks have to offer and learning about the Earth’s many beauties.

Couples that seek a green honeymoon have a world of options and a little research a romantic green honeymoon is well within reach.

Green Burial

The green movement is spreading to cemeteries as more green burial options become available

By Leah Kaminsky

If there’s one infallible truth in life, it’s that we’re all going to die some day. Yet, rather than facing up to this fact, we’ve developed whole industries to prolong the illusion of youth and life, from plastic surgery to marble caskets and embalming procedures that keep us looking good and as far away from decomposition as possible.

Unfortunately, this denial of death is pretty bad for the earth. Embalming fluid contains carcinogens, which can leak into the soil. Coffins made from hardwoods and metals needs to be transported across great distances, increasing carbon emissions, and most also leak toxic lacquers. Cemeteries require a lot of upkeep to maintain, including the use of fertilizers and pesticides. What’s more, it’s difficult to sustain a practice that prevents biodegradation.

But before you get too depressed (as if talking about death wasn’t enough), know that there are a few green burial options that are becoming increasingly popular. Embalming fluid can be replaced with non-toxic refrigeration or dry ice, which will be sufficient for keeping the deceased presentable through the viewing. There are also a number of companies supplying eco-caskets made from sustainably sourced woods or woven from natural fabrics like cotton, silk or linen. For the truly eco-obsessed, there are also wicker and cardboard options, as well newspaper-based biodegradable kayak-shaped caskets called Ecopods.

As the green movement spreads, there are more green cemeteries stepping up to the fill the void. Green cemeteries use flat stones or native trees as grave markers, or eschew the physical marker altogether with GPS technology. Some even restore the land to what it used to be. There is even a Green Burial Council to monitor it all.

So, how do you want to be buried? It might not be the most inspiring question, but the answers sure are interesting.

How to Recycle e-Waste

By Leah Kaminsky

As technology advances at lightning speed, we’ve become used to upgrading our devices on a regular basis. But we don’t often think about where our old electronics go and whom they’re harming when they’re there. The common though is “once it’s in the trash, it’s out of our minds.”

So where do our unwanted devices go? The answer is simple: nowhere good. Too often companies claiming to be recyclers send our e-waste abroad to third world countries where they take a massive toll on the environment as well as on human health.

What to do?

First, think of ways you can get more life out of your devices. That means (dare I say it?) holding on to them for a little longer or giving them to a younger member of the family. You can also look for companies that will refurbish devices, saving salvageable parts and using them to make something new. Or sell your old products online and see a return on some of your investment. You can find a number of companies who will resell devices for you, taking the hassle of shipping and customer management out of the equation.

Another great option is to donate those old devices to schools or charities, especially in countries where resources and capital are scarce. For example, just having a cell phone to arrange meetings can radically improve the lot of a small businesswoman in a foreign country. Before donating, make sure to check out a charity’s credentials and follow any guidelines they might have. For example, don’t just drop off an old computer at a school, as they might not even have the need for old technology.

Sure, it takes a little more thought to reduce the impact of your e-waste, but we’ve got to do something to counter the negative effects of our technology addiction. Being proactive about what you do with old technology is the first step.

Why Biking is Good for the Planet and for You

By Leah Kaminsky

It’s been nearly a year since I packed up my studio in Seattle and moved down to Austin. And I’m ashamed to report that my bike sat in its shipping packaging for most of that time. Because, you know…unpacking requires effort.

Fortunately, a recent getaway to the Hill Country changed all that. Just a few minutes riding past wildflowers in full bloom and I was extolling biking’s myriad health benefits. Sure, it was a great way to mix up my regular cardio workout, but I also found it cleared my head, relaxed me, and was just a great way to get around.

Since I’ve returned from my trip, I’ve been into my bike, discovering all sorts of new treasures I’d passed a million times in a car and never noticed. It’s so much easier to get in a workout when I combine it with a commute, and I love skating around traffic jams. Plus, as someone who’s still relatively new to town, it buys me a ticket into a whole bike culture here, helping me meet people as I spin away.

Biking is a culture that’s growing as many green cities try to cut down on their carbon emissions and clear out clogged highways. Bikes help us reduce our dependence on gas, produce no more emissions than what we breathe out, and need fewer parts repairs.

Still, biking is unappealing to many people as it can be quite dangerous in cities that are built for cars. You’ll have to look out for aggressive drivers, opening doors, cars that don’t notice you when making turns, and blind spots when riding next to a truck.

If your city is in particular need of a reform, try forming a bike advocacy group and lobbying the city for larger, more visible bike lanes, particularly dedicated greenways and wider streets.

Yes, I know if you’re reading this from your home in San Francisco I’m not telling you anything you don’t already know. But for the rest of you, I say, give biking a whirl. It’s a great way to get exercise, reduce emissions and get to work in one go. You just can’t say that about walking or driving.

Get Your Back to School Green On

By Leah Kaminsky

As the bliss of summer fades – goodbye sweet barbecues, goodbye lovely visits to the lake – September returns along with all the exciting and overwhelming hassles inextricably tied to your children’s return to school. And while the biggest concern for your kids is likely choosing the right lunch table or doing better in their weakest subject, keeping things eco-friendly in a school setting is a major concern on your mind. How can you maintain your child’s summer green throughout the school year? Here are our top tips.

Get excited for back-to-school season by swapping old habits for greener traditions.

  1. The power of your own two legs. If you live relatively near your school, have your child bike, walk, rollerblade, skateboard, whatever to school, saving carpooling for travel to extracurricular events. This will get blood pumping to your child’s brain in the morning, putting them in the right mood for learning. And it will save on gas, too.
  1. Forget the packaged lunches. Bring your eco-friendly mentality to the lunchbox by packing your child a locally sourced, organic lunch. Be careful to include only as much food as you know they’ll eat – no unnecessary food scraps. Pack with reusable sleeves and containers, whether that’s stainless steel, washable bags, cloth napkins, or BPA-free plastic-ware.
  2. Be strategic with new purchases. So you’ve got your school supply list and your kid is foaming at the mouth with anticipation of your trip to the office supply store. Do your best to keep new purchases low, recycling backpacks and notebooks when you can, and purchasing recycled and refillable pencils and pens. Make old materials like backpacks new by sewing on fun patches. Try to keep your child’s use of paper low, saving old paper for scrap, using both sides, and switching whenever you can over to an e-reader.
  1. Clothe with care. For the perfect back to school outfit, look for clothing made from organic cotton. Buying second-hand clothes is also a great way to go, especially when you’ve given old clothes yourself for store credit. For even more fun, arrange a clothing swap amongst your child’s friends.

Going back to school doesn’t have to mean losing your child’s well-honed green. With a little forethought, your whole family can stay eco-friendly without dampening the excitement of the back to school shop.